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Influence: India
Genre: world
About "Peace Mantra"
This composition by Prashant is based on the Mantra
Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu
“May All Beings Be Happy”

It was recorded in Prashant’s bedroom except for the trumpet recorded in Toronto by Gary Diggins. The singers and musicians are from the local Calgary community and consist of non professional and some professional musicians. Mastered at Profile Sound Studios in Vancouver by my good friend Sean Hollowaychuk.
Tiffiny Chine: Voice, Keyboard
Amchok Gompo: Voice
Sanghavasini: Voice
Anick: Voice
Pamela Alexander: Voice
Helmer Kuskanox (Two Youngmen) : Mouthbow, Spoken word
Ferron: Native Chant
Khoji Vihara: Silver flute
Trevor Uruski: Didgeridoo
Steve Gertz: Didgeridoo
Prashant: Composition, Guitars, Bamboo and Native American flutes, Beats

Intro quotes:
When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
Jimi Hendrix

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.
Mahatma Gandhi

If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.
Mother Teresa

Sanskrit Mantras
Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu (May all beings be happy)

Sarvesham svastir bhavatu (may everyone experience wellness)
sarvesham shantir bhavatu ( " " peace)
sarvesham poornam bhavatu ( " " fullness)
sarvesham mangalam bhavatu ( " " auspiciousness)

SpokenText (Black Elk)

The first peace, which is the most important, is that which comes from within the souls of men when they realize their relationship, their oneness, with the universe and all its powers, and when they realize that at the center of the universe dwells Wakan-Tanka, and that this center is really everywhere, it is within each of us. This is the real peace, and the others are but reflections of this. The second peace is that which is made between two individuals, and the third is that which is made between two nations. But above all you should understand that there can never be peace between nations until there is first known that true peace which is within the souls of men.
Black Elk in The Sacred Pipe: Black Elk's Account of the Seven Rites of the Oglala Sioux (1953).