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Robin B. James
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United States
BLOGS
 
Gentle and mysterious electronic instrumental music,Illusive flows through various terrains and landscapes, responding to elemental changes and discoveries along the way, accomplishing thorough and ultimately dramatic transformations in the form, appearance, and character of the soundscape. What you will hear will sometimes be something that might not be what it seems to be, just when the view of a jungle plateau is coming into focus it might soon disappear and be replaced with something even more complex and inexplicable. This is the beauty and direction of the compositional work of Kelly David.

Illusive whispers about some sort of visual deception, a mirage, a dreamlike image that appears one way at first glance, but upon further reflection, one realizes there is something deeper in there and makes you want to search deeper, to discover what lies within. Kelly recapitulates, "Illusive refers to a quality of what you're seeing or hearing or where the direction you think the music is going may actually be headed somewhere else. Perhaps this relates to the state of the world during the time of this recording: we weren't so sure of many things.” Illusive offers a journey that is satisfying to the listener, revealing a vision of some new territory ahead.

It is possible that I am dreaming right now and that all of my perceptions are false. The ability of the mind to be tricked into believing that a mentally generated world is the "real world" is actually a common, even nightly event. Listening to Illusive, you might be able to see in this soundtrack a resemblance to various different unexplored planets adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, flora, fauna, plains, wide valleys, and various groups of hills and caverns. The first encounter is with a person or thing that watches or stands as if watching.

From the opening vocal-like phrases to the last crash of the waves, this new album by the artist Kelly David is a voyage of granular organic electronic instrumental music. Illusive has seven tracks and provides an engaging flow, the sonic events constantly change and smoothly lead into new situations and discoveries. There are delicate details, vast quiet spaces and sweeping motion which keeps the listener pleasantly guessing and glowing. The sounds are not natural, with a few exceptions: some birds, some water, and there are probably some more mysterious field recordings hidden in the mix, which any great chef understandably celebrates without revealing all of his kitchen secrets. The most prominent ingredients are calm and curious. By the end of this album, the listener is left with a feeling of quiet uplift, knowing the world renews and a sense of hope will prevail.

The composer, Kelly David, graciously shares some insight into his motivations: “This is definitely my pandemic album. I started on the album in March of 2020 and finished a year later. My excursions into my studio became an escape from the uncertainty, fear and madness of the outside world over the last year...this was a translation of the peace I was seeking within myself.”

The musician continues. "The title Illusive is an adjective that derives from 17th century Latin. It means “based on or producing illusion.” As I worked on the music I was aware of shifts in darkness and light, tensions releasing into pleasing harmonies. As I grew closer to the finish, I began to listen to the tracks as a whole concept. I then realized that all of the tracks hung together through this essential peaceful quality that formed the core of each track with a delicate quality I was not consciously aware of during the writing . While I asked musical questions and provided musical answers, an essential quiet and peaceful quality kept pushing through.

"To me, this is certainly an ambient album, although there is quite a lot of movement underneath the ambient. It is always about change. No sound or combination of sounds remain the same for long. There is constant, subtle change. Illusive is an album that many will want to sleep with as the music invites dreaming."

As the project took form, “I began with some predetermined compositional structure for each piece. Mostly, it was a set of harmonic materials, namely a reliance on the subset modes of the major scales. Sometimes I modulated between different harmonic modes in the same piece. The modes often impact the emotional quality of a track as some modes are inherently sad or create a feeling of longing.

“In writing Illusive, I relied on a more complex harmonic structure than my previous album. I focused on the harmonic modes, both major and minor, to form the unifying harmonic structure. In several pieces, I wove several different modes into the same track. Also I deliberately created more space between sections, allowing silence to seep in throughout the album. What is consistent throughout my music is the use of my field recordings, the recorded natural environments range from deep woods recorded at midnight to a wave-pounding subtropical sea shore.

“Once I reached the point in recording the album where I recognized the quiet delicacy in the music, images of impressionist visual art came to mind: distinct and varied colors, often with the softness of water colors and then deeper, darker waters that flowed deep inside the music.”

Although illusions distort our perception of reality, they are generally shared by most people, thus resulting in fine art. What you will encounter are castles in the air, an array of illusions of hearing, exploring mysterious technologies that allow the composer to construct new worlds inside your headphones. This music invites us to consider the experience of discovering phantom objects and the realization that this entire gigantic gallery is artificial, designed for celebrating curiosity, and showing how to find inspiration for many of our possible futures.

Natural laws are different in this new place. The wilderness ahead is nothing like what we know on our home planet. The night fogs here are chromatically rich and endowed with vast electronic string and choral apparitions. The surroundings are vast and there is a watchman in the haunted tower, "Sentinel" (9:20) opens the voyage, exploring crafted hallucinations and invented soundscapes never before attempted. Later there is something like drumming coming from the distance, with melodic swirling fragments.

There is a tiny bit of a street in Oahu, where on a vacation in a house there, Kelly David recorded some of the themes that appear in "Palione" (9:54). Whilst presiding in the soft and brilliant foliage of this strange world, around a salt water pool, his peaceful and serene themes flow along from there past here. A bubbling form of electronic percussion emerges briefly, followed by beams of celestial color and reverberation, sometimes I can hear something like gulls in the distance, avian phantasms.

Distance is a relational measurement of how far apart objects or points are. Our path can be seen from great reaches, providing a deceptive appearance or impression of infinity. There are cycles of activity that rise and fall, there are occasional breezes and passing birds that are unlike anything that I have ever heard before, and then through the furthest trees I can hear the open sea, suggesting blue waters shimmering beneath the brazen sun. "Distance" (7:33) is an illusion of space, which changes as perspective adjusts. As I near the confines of the imaginary forest I see before me, between the grove and the open sea, a broad expanse of meadow land. As I am about to emerge from the shadows of the strange trees, a sight meets my eyes and ignites new wonderment for the beauties in this fantastic expanding landscape.

All of these elements are woven throughout these sonic stories. This track starts off with a sense of building energy just below the surface. Delicate reverberations and sparkling sprites cavort beneath fog horns that call darkly out to the vast quiet ocean. These sound like jungle birds hidden in the magical foliage. Behold the "Garden of the Forgotten" (5:19), as one turns their glance in any direction the garth has the appearance at a little distance of a vast, high-ceiled chamber. Hear the choirs of neo-electronic ignis fatuus, perhaps something like the terrestrial the will-o'-the-wisp, performing various lilting calls in the arboreal canopies. Tension builds and eventually releases as the passing elements reflect strangely changing colors.

As far aloft as I can see the stems and branches and twigs are smooth and highly polished and filled with brilliant, nameless birds. I call them birds since they are winged, but mortal ears have never rested upon such odd, unearthly shapes. "Top of the Trees" (8:03) is where the phantom blooms cluster thickly upon these strange branches and may not be described in any earthly tongue. Do these exotic steamy tropics have a variety of snowflakes? Something sparkly is decorating the breezes above.

The definition of ether is the sky, used especially when describing electronic signals that travel through the air. "Into The Ether" (12:25) brings a gentle taste of ether, or æther, the mysterious substance once thought to suffuse the universe. This track’s title might suggest something disappearing into nothing, like a specter of pure fantasy. The motion of the music is like a heat mirage, swaying and shimmering in plain sight off in the distance ahead, guarding the facts while lulling the urgencies of the daily hubble-bubble. Through the entire duration of this track there is the sense of a grand piano reverberating continuously, sort of glowing on and on without diminishing, guarding your dreamscape and allowing for a more complete escape.

The final track breaks open the box and leaves clues to follow into new territory, again! Further go our ears, receiving whispered reports of alien lands and never before encountered ways of being. Is the music coming up from the ocean depths or floating down from the distant heavens? I hear the surf on the shore, an oceanic heartbeat. I hear the call and response echoes of electronic cryptids reeling in the trackless regions of interplanetary space. "Northcoast" (15:52) mixes the rise and fall of oceanic planetary life with the distant horns of the angels. Along the way in one place I hear a lonely harmonica coming from somewhere in the caverns below. I find that my senses have been absorbed by inspiring visions of phosphorescent notes from the depths of the earth while looking right up into the night sky over the open waters. Later we discover clouds of artificial cicadas in those oceanic caves.

The music of Illusive is part of an ongoing process, learning to rotate, scale, skew, transfigure or translate a sonic chorus of disparate elements, a guide for cataloging the ideas about distant intelligent life in the universe, inviting adventurers to traverse the trackless void at will, coming and going between the countless planets. I have a love of expansive time, containing wide, open-voiced chords and things that suggest foreign auditory phantoms, using a technology that lies beyond our horizons, perhaps the technology of para-physical forces.

Kelly David has a small but growing handful of unique albums which explore these experiences of constant synthetic metamorphosis, he is pioneering a new form of organic electronic ambient audio arts. His first album with Spotted Peccary Music, Meditation in Green (2019) is a continuation of a musical journey that began with Kelly’s independently released first album, Broken Voyage (2002), mixed and produced by Steve Roach. On his second independent album, Angkor (2006), the sounds came from a first reflection of Asian travels and deep fascination, both academic and experiential, of the ancient Khmer civilization that dominated SE Asia in the 10th century. Steve Roach mastered Angkor, contributing his sonic treatment to the mixes. After that, for a shared album, The Long Night (2014), is a full-on collaboration with Steve where they worked "side by side" in Kelly’s Denver studio and Steve's Arizona studio, creating a deep work meant for the virtual dead of night. Kelly reflects, "Steve Roach opened the door for me and showed me how to walk through it."

Like its predecessor, Meditation in Green, Illusive revels in natural beauty, blending wilderness samples with luminous synths and psychedelic textures. Illusive, however, dwells as much in internal landscapes as external ones. Reflective, introspective, yet filled with wonder, the album released October 15, 2021 in CD format and in 24-BIT AUDIOPHILE, CD QUALITY LOSSLESS, MP3 and streaming formats; various platforms available at https://orcd.co/illusive

Tracklist:
1 Sentinel
2 Palione
3 Distance
4 Garden of the Forgotten
5 Top of the Trees
6 Into The Ether
7 Northcoast

About Kelly David:
In high school, Kelly was heavily influenced by the music of Frank Zappa. Through Frank Zappa interviews in magazines and newspapers, Kelly learned about the music of Stockhausen, Varese and other 20th century masters who provided a first direction to Kelly in electronic music. After a move “out west” to Denver in 1997, Kelly met Tucson’s ambient and electronic music master, Steve Roach. They subsequently developed a personal and professional kinship. Steve mixed and produced Kelly’s first album, Broken Voyage in 2002 and mastered and added spatial enhancements to Kelly’s 2006 release, Angkor. In 2014, Kelly collaborated with Steve on an album called The Long Night. Meditation in Green is Kelly’s first release for Spotted Peccary, and Illusive is the second.

About Spotted Peccary Music:
Portland-based Spotted Peccary Music is North America’s finest independent record label with a focus on deep, vast and introspective soundscapes. For over three decades, the artists of Spotted Peccary have been on a mission to develop, produce, publish and release ultra-high-quality, deep-listening experiences that engage the listener and exceed expectations. Every release is carefully prepared in a variety of high quality formats from MP3 to high-res studio masters. Explore more than 165 titles and 45 artists at www.SpottedPeccary.com and www.AmbientElectronic.com.

Links:
Spotted Peccary Album Page: https://spottedpeccary.com/shop/illusive/
CD unboxing video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AcG-280CeZE
Bandcamp: https://ambientelectronic.bandcamp.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spottedpeccary/
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/user/spottedpeccary
The Artist: https://kellydavid.bandcamp.com/
Home base: https://kellydavid.com/
More about Kelly David and Meditation in Green: https://ello.co/robinja56/post/sr8v_pv-axl_azrf1ybr3q
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For all time, the stars have beguiled, have evoked awe and wonder. Though these five pieces capture the grandeur of the skies, this album was named for its composition. The title Horizon inspires the joy of collaboration—discovery—as the exchange of ideas takes a composition to a beautiful and unexpected place.

Morris says their best work comes when they compose without “any preconceived notions of where things should go or what we should do,” and this album embodies that open-minded approach to songwriting. These pieces shift and shimmer, morphing seamlessly from one beat to another. On “Ocean of Fire,” expansive ambiance ebbs and surges over reverberant frame drum before skittering percussion and a modular synth groove ascend to a captivating crescendo. Tension builds on stunning opener “Eye of Everything, ” as a complex tribal beat propels the listener through a cinematic landscape of submerged drones and panoramic vistas. “Woven” is both cavernous and celestial; freeform percussion coalesces into a beat beneath a spacious texture, a sound like surfacing from a subterranean space.

Frore describes Horizon as a mixture of “past and present, ancient and future,” and for all time the stars have beguiled. Ancient cultures looked to the stars for wisdom, for guidance, for signs from the divine. Now, scientists look to the stars for knowledge, for a deeper understanding of our universe, for humanity’s next step. As tribal rhythms entrance the listener, ethereal synthesizers enrapture with the thrill of the unknown, with the promise of discovery—to capture perfectly the essence of the horizon: the place where earth meets the sky.

When talking about the influences for their sound, Frore revealed that “Everything comes into play. The human idea of what the self is, BBC Planet Earth documentaries, industrial music, dub techno, ragas.” Morris adds, “I think we are always working with an influence of cultures from around the world, history, and the music from so many different sources whether it be ambient, electronic, ethnic folk traditions, and sounds from field recordings.”

Frore is the ambient music project of Paul Casper, a musician hailing from southeastern Virginia, in the USA. Paul has a unique approach to ambient music, always seeking to fuse what he calls “primitive sounds” with current technology. The music of Frore has been featured on the Hearts of Space radio show, the Star’s End radio show and is frequently played on Stillstream.com, the ambient radio channel among other outlets.

Shane Morris is a percussionist, synthesist, and composer of ambient electronic music. Inspired by nature, patterns, and systems, he shapes ethereal realms, polyrhythmic grooves, and tribal soundscapes using a variety of acoustic and electronic instruments, processing, hardware and software. He also holds a BA in Anthropology and Music with an emphasis in “Trance” and has been playing music professionally for nearly 20 years.

Byron Metcalf has been intensely involved in consciousness research and spiritual development for over 30 years, specializing in the transformative potential of alternative states of consciousness, to support people in developing their capacity for soul-based and heart-centered living as they contribute to the spiritual healing and maturity of humanity. He has been a musician for over 50 years, becoming a professional drummer when he was fifteen years old, eventually playing on several gold and platinum albums.

Mark Seelig received classical training on the violin from age 8 through 14, and then taught himself guitar and vocals. From early on he felt a growing fascination with the world’s spiritual traditions. During a deep vision quest, in 1999 at age 42, his musical focus shifted again, he felt encouraged to take up the Bansuri, which is a North Indian bamboo flute. He is also a Certified Holotropic Breathwork Practitioner, specializing in Archetypal Astrology, and Shamanic Divination Ceremonies.

Dirk Serries began working in the early 1980s in the Belgian DIY industrial tape music scene as Vidna Obmana, which in Serbian translates as "optical illusion." While his first recordings featured harsh industrial music, his work gradually shifted into ambient music and a primitive tribal sound. His next musical incarnation, Fear Falls Burning, began in 2005, followed in 2012 by his Microphonics projects, with a more improvisational avant-garde jazz feeling.

The album Horizon is an ambitious exploration of drone meditations and percussion, combining the languages of hand-created beats with soaring electronic atmospheres, a new energy and life comes from the music. It’s a real joy to listen to, feeling the joy of the musicians, the human idea of what the self is, industrial music, dub techno, ragas, history and mythology. The overall experience is calming and inspirational. The talents who originated this journey know the territory of transformative consciousness raising and international rhythm traditions. This music is perfect for creating a positive sonic environment for healing as well as for relaxation. The horizon is vast and the offing is forever distant, bringing a fantastic sensation of infinity.

For those who love mystery, exploring inner space, savoring world music flavors, and intellectual excitement, here are five tracks exploring the art of sustained tonal patterns, some with beats from various hand instruments, all delivered with deep inspirational passion, always changing and constantly evolving. You can tell that these musicians are always working with an influence of cultures from around the world, history, and the music from so many different sources, including ambient, electronic, ethnic folk traditions, and sounds from field recordings. Everything comes into play. These collaborative events suggest a mixture of the past and present, ancient and future, influenced by the previous work of tribal ambient pioneers who came before, blending acoustic instruments that are heavily processed, sculpting and carving out sounds. These collaborations provide a look forward into the future.

The eye is a sense organ that reacts to light and allows vision. The eye is also the focus of a hurricane, the point about which the rest of a storm rotates and where the wind becomes strangely calm. The eye of anything is the focus of awareness, the point about which the rest rotates. "The Eye of Everything" (12:09) is a duet by Frore and Morris, emerging from the void, enrolling the elements of electronic sounds and hand percussion.

To be truly inspired, a musician may become one with this inspiration, the inner being and the outer world—along with the very art itself. As a collective of creative types, musicians seek inspiration everywhere, and in everything. Unconditional love, the highest form of love, charity, the love of God for man and of man for God, are all classical definitions of the Greek word "Agape" (10:57), which is performed by the trio of Frore, Morris and Mark Seelig. Featured are the sounds of the Bansuri flute, an aerophone made from bamboo and used in Hindustani classical music. This combination creates a steady universal sound that transcends and persists, it goes beyond just the emotions, employing electronics, breath, and hand percussion; long sustained tones with many subtle variations.

Wide open musical colors and textures, steadily building into a tight energized groove, interlacing, braiding and intertwining threads or fibers of sound, blending elements of terrestrial ethnic or indigenous musical traditions and pulling from gentle chaos, coming together between the warp and weft of the duo Frore and Morris: "Woven" (12:47).

What does it mean to be lost in something? A sense of being astray in the unknown, a feeling of amazement and admiration, caused by something beautiful, remarkable, and unfamiliar. Dirk Serries joins Frore and Morris, beaming combinations of harmonic relationships, which move slowly from one to the next sustained chord or cluster of notes that linger uninterrupted, the sound of the wind blowing is evoked by a flute. "Lost in Wonder" (8:56) yields a wide variety of musical possibilities, a collection of diversity in styles and collaborative dynamics, from the endless drone of pure bliss to the almost hidden flight of free melodic improvisation.

"Ocean of Fire" (16:34) was created by Frore, Morris and percussionist Byron Metcalf. This final track enters with organic surf, crashing on a pebble beach and builds in stages steadily into a most passionate pace, energy in waves, mixing percussion over sustained tones to produce an ambient, minimalist, and often avant-garde soundscape, while maintaining a tribal house characteristic in the sound. This is a very big ocean.

Horizon was mastered by Ben Cox, and is available for physical purchase in CD format and in 24-BIT AUDIOPHILE, CD QUALITY LOSSLESS, MP3 and streaming formats worldwide. The CD version of Horizon arrives in a factory sealed 6-panel gatefold package that includes vibrant artwork, liner notes, a 4-page booklet, and artful package design by Daniel Pipitone.

Tracklist:
1 The Eye of Everything
2 Agape
3 Woven
4 Lost in Wonder
5 Ocean of Fire

Links:
Spotted Peccary Album Page: https://spottedpeccary.com/shop/horizon/
Smart Link: https://orcd.co/horizon-spm
Bandcamp: https://ambientelectronic.bandcamp.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spottedpeccary/
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/user/spottedpeccary

Frore & Shane Morris – Horizon – CD Unboxing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcY6s1Ln5Rc more
An homage to her Jewish ancestors, who fled the Russian pogroms, Lisa Swerdlow hopes the music offers solace for anyone trying to build a better life in America. An accomplished pianist and composer of classical crossover and contemporary instrumental music, announces the debut of her Coming to America Concerto, a dynamic and cinematic exploration of a journey of Russian immigrants, told in three movements. It released globally on all digital platforms, and is also available in physical CD format from Bandcamp. Swerdlow will perform the concerto live at The Center for the Arts on November 13, 2021 as part of the Ten Hands - 88 Keys concert in Grass Valley, CA.

Swerdlow considers herself a storyteller, and this is the story of her grandparents, who in the early 1900s, escaped the pogroms of Russia and found refuge in a new land. The Coming to America Concerto blends musical voices with sweeping layered piano-driven instrumentation including clarinet, cello, flute, oboe, and violin. The musical journey moves from pensive and reflective to more uplifting melodies, as the story evolves from difficult circumstances in the homeland, to rousing aural images of hope in New York Harbor.

“Last year, I started researching my grandparents’ immigration to the United States from Russia (and what is now Ukraine) in the years 1907-1910 due to persecution of the Jewish people,” says Swerdlow. “I reflected on the courage it must have taken for them to leave their homeland of many centuries, their family and friends, to sail to a foreign country they had barely heard of called 'America.' The music came to me, and I started writing.”

"The inspiration for composing the Coming To America Concerto came during the long Covid-19 quarantine. As I spent days, weeks and eventually months in my home, I started researching my grandparents’ immigration to the United States from Russia (and what is now Ukraine) in the years 1907-1910 due to persecution of the Jewish people. I reflected on the courage it must have taken for them to leave their homeland of many centuries, their family and friends, to sail to a foreign country they had barely heard of called “America.” Had these villagers and townspeople not made that sacrifice, I would not have been born here, in this country that--even with all its flaws and dark eras of history--has given me so many freedoms and choices not available to the current people of Russia and Ukraine.

"I dedicate this concerto to my Grandparents, and to all the immigrants who come to this country called “America” in search of safety and the promise of Hope."

The Movements

First Movement: Home of My Ancestors
This Russian klezmer-themed movement tells the tale of life in the Jewish ghettos and villages of late 19th and early 20th century Russia. Life had its joys and celebrations as well as its fears, especially of the Czar’s army showing up to desecrate what the villagers most loved and valued: their traditions, their homes, their temples. But, the Jewish people were and are resilient people who keep their spirits alive, even in the face of adversity. Finally, the time came for them to seek a new homeland.

Second Movement: The Crossing
In this movement, I imagined my Grandparents carrying what possessions they could, living in cramped steerage quarters far below deck on a huge ocean liner such as the Mauritania. The music captures the journey: feeling seasick, longing for their homeland, the great trepidation of crossing an endless ocean bound for “America,” which was probably more of a concept to them than an actual place. Their uncertainty is matched only by their determination to best the conditions on board; sometimes they dream of home.

Third Movement: The Arrival
At long last, they step onto the deck of the ship. Their excitement and anticipation grows as they make out New York Harbor on the horizon. The huge ship’s engines grind into reverse, as the shoreline grows closer and the harbor becomes clear. The reality dawns: a new life is awaiting them, in a country where they don’t speak the language, don’t understand its currency, and don’t have any friends or relatives waiting for them. Still, as they sail next to the Statue of Liberty, they understand her welcoming message, feeling grateful for their new homeland.

Lisa began studying classical piano at the age of six, and by age 16, she was writing and performing songs on piano and guitar. She went on to study music theory and composition at Humboldt State University and College of the Redwoods. Lisa's early musical influences range from Laura Nyro and Carole King to Harry Belafonte and Burt Bacharach. Later in life, she was drawn to the piano music of Keith Jarrett, David Lanz, Eddy Palmieri, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Barbara Higbie and Mary Watkins.

In the 1970s, Lisa performed in coffee houses on Fairfax Avenue in L.A. and went on to play piano in a rock 'n' roll band in San Francisco. In the 1980s she performed at the West Coast Women's Music Festival, and soon after toured Northern California with a ten-piece all women salsa band called Las Malandras. These genres have influenced her unique composing style, and Lisa has moved into more complex orchestration and arrangements in recent years.

Swerdlow's America is a concept of refuge as well as a land of new opportunities. America can be the first choice for a new start, but sometimes it was also the last resort after losing everything. Her concerto tells a story of loss and disaster, which resolves into a positive message of inspiration, survival and spiritual endurance.

The music was recorded at Piano Haven Studio, in Sedona, AZ. It was engineered by Joe Bongiorno, orchestrated by Doug Hammer, and mastered at Dreamworld Productions. The EP is available in various formats including physical CD, digital download, and streaming worldwide; Swerdlow's music can be found on Spotify playlists including Calming Piano and Strings, Elegant Music, Romantic Piano Moods, and many more.

Coming to America Concerto - Tracklist
"Movement 1: Home of My Ancestors" (3:36)
"Movement 2: The Crossing" (3:41)
"Movement 3: The Arrival" (3:42)

Buy, stream or download the Coming to America Concerto by Lisa Swerdlow from the platform of your choice: http://hyperurl.co/t9pn0h

Links:
Official website - http://lisaswerdlow.com/
Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/lisaswerdlow/
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/LisaSwerdlowPiano/
Bandcamp - https://lisaswerdlow1.bandcamp.com/
Twitter - https://twitter.com/LisaSwerdlow
Concert Tix - https://thecenterforthearts.org/event/ten-hands-88-keys/

Preview: Coming to America Concerto
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBi2JygDpz4
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Jeffrey Ericson Allen is an Oregonian composer, cellist and electronic music recording artist with an extensive and eclectic background in classical, new acoustic and theatrical music production. Chronotope Project represents his most recent expression as a creator of contemporary progressive ambient music. “Chronotope” refers to the essential unity of space and time, a concept with numerous expressions in literature, physics and the arts. The music of Chronotope Project explores this time-space confluence and invites the listener on ambient journeys of deep texture infused with gentle pulsing rhythms and soulful melodies. His newest album is titled γνῶσις which translates to Gnosis.

The album debuts on Spotted Peccary Music, in physical, digital and streaming formats worldwide, have a listen: https://orcd.co/gnosis

A new video for the track “Entelechy, Emergent Order” premieres Friday, August 20, 2021 at 1:00 pm PST / 4:00 pm EST on Spotted Peccary's YouTube channel.

For inspiration, Allen reconnected with the ancient Greek philosophers who he was first enraptured with in his twenties. He found music in Plato’s inquiries; he saw in philosophical paradoxes the push-and-pull of musical counterpoint, the tension and release of dissonance and resolution. On GNOSIS (γνῶσις), Chronotope Project uses his signature jazz and classical-inflected progressive ambient sound to portray the greatest philosophical inquiry of all: a quest for knowledge.

Reflections on Plato permeate the work. The artist expands upon this vision, "I’m intrigued with his rich imagery and have found much music in it. The dialectical style of the dialogues has often reminded me of the conversational elements of music.” He continues, “It is not necessarily Plato’s philosophical answers, but his framing of the questions, and the passion with which they are posed that most inspire me. The antinomies present in Plato’s philosophical inquiry are akin both to the procedure of musical counterpoint and to the tension and release of harmonic dissonance and resolution which animate music and provide a sense of forward motion."

Allen continues, "Besides being essentially expressive, music is communication, a reaching out to our fellow sojourners on the planet, a desire to connect on a non-rational level. For me, music is fundamentally an expression of wonder, a way to touch mysteries within and beyond me, a way to bring unconscious impulses into the flow of the waking world, to dream aloud. No one expressed it better than Glenn Gould:

“I believe that the justification of art is the internal combustion it ignites in the hearts of men and not its shallow, externalized, public manifestations. The purpose of art is not the release of a momentary ejection of adrenaline but is, rather, the gradual, lifelong construction of a state of wonder and serenity.”

Sound is the subtlest and most transient of artistic media. We compose scores or create recordings, but only while the music plays, and someone listens, does it exist. A piece of music may have a beginning, middle and end, it may be tightly or only loosely structured, but its form is invisible and only perceptible as a function of change over time. So it has this unique way of existing in and outside of time.

Like storytelling, music is an attempt to create a narrative that structures our inner world, a way to bring coherence and meaning to the chaos of life.

Q: What is listening?

A: Listening is attention. It is the quieting of the mind to allow the surrounding vibrations to penetrate our awareness. Perceiving musical sounds require presence, but also memory and anticipation to become coherent; the meaning of a melody, harmonic progression or a rhythm requires us to take in a larger present-moment, one that can encompass a history of pitch, texture and accentuation. We hear not just a succession of pitches, but a musical phrase that reveals itself over time.

Listening, as an auditor, is surrendering oneself to what is being presented, allowing it to sink in a work on us.

Listening, as a performer, is the art of attending carefully to what fellow musicians are doing in creating and shaping sound. It is acknowledging that music is a form of conversation, requiring give and take and adaptation to the moment.

As a composer, listening is the art of attending to the possibilities of as-yet unheard sounds that populate the unconscious. Often, when I am layering tracks, I listen for intriguing parts of the texture that are suggested, but not explicit, then emphasize them. Listening is essential to improvisation, the playful response to existing sounds, followed by shaping and structuring.

Deep listening is humility; it is letting go of personal purposes and agendas to embrace the wonder of sound that is everywhere, to partake of what is not myself in order to better know myself. When the old Zen teachers asked students to listen for the sound of one hand clapping, they were trying to draw out this kind of humility. Deep listening is not identifying, judging or otherwise mentally commenting on sounds, but experiencing them as they come. I try to spend some time every day listening in this way. It's difficult, if not impossible, for me to do this with music, but just sitting quietly with whatever sounds are present in the environment is good practice.

Throughout my life as a musician, I have tried to cultivate my ear, along with my craft of making music. My aim is to keep the ear always slightly ahead of my technique. If the ear lags, I may become complacent or over-confident; if it stretches too far ahead of my craft, I may be setting myself up for crushing dissatisfaction. This part of listening is the part I identify with longing, the reach exceeding the grasp.

Q: What is your goal as a composer?

A: I want to connect intimately with the solitary listener. I treasure the communications I have received from listeners who have in some way deeply connected and really resonated with my music. I no longer have any particular interest in chasing or cultivating followers or fans as an aggregate, or in securing some position or credential in my genre. My goal is to reach the height of my craft, to create with all of the longing, loving care and attention to detail I can muster. With each new work I complete, I want to be able to say that I have transcended what came before it. I do not make anything with a view to what I think my audience will want or like; my aim is to try to satisfy myself that I have done my very best work, that I have grown in my art.

I also aim to continue to develop my own unique style, to offer a contribution to my art form that is original and coherent and expressive of who I am as a person and an artist. It is a high compliment to be told "I heard this piece, and I recognized it as yours." It has taken years of experimentation to develop a style, and of course that style must and will continue to evolve and change, but I see no point in making music that sounds like everyone else's. This is tied to my personal goal of what Maslow called individuation. It is the lifelong project of becoming oneself. Art is an excellent way to pursue this project, and while my life is very conventional in many respects, music offers me a way to discover and develop a unique identity. So for me, to work on music is to work on myself.

Q: What is your advice to artists who are starting their careers?

A: Be patient, and focus on developing your craft. Don't be too eager for recognition; I have made this mistake and regretted it. Don't try to please anyone else with your music: please yourself instead. T.S. Eliot once exchanged letters with an aspiring young poet who was concerned with reviews and reception. He counseled the poet with this wisdom: "It is enough to do your own work--the rest is none of your business."

Most musical recordings have a very short life in the public arena. In the first few months, your work may be played on the radio, reviewed and talked about and given whatever fleeting attention it may garner. And unless you've succeeded in producing a classic, in less than a year, radio producers move on. The public appears mostly interested in what is latest, what is new. Don't let this discourage you. Move on to the next work, and make it better. Maybe you will eventually create something less ephemeral, but remember: "the rest is none of your business."

Cultivate your musicianship. Train your ear, work on your playing chops, extend your knowledge of music theory. Stay hungry for the craft.

Develop good working habits and revisit your workflow every so often. Read your manuals, and learn your hardware--and software--inside out. Resist technolust. Don't get addicted to buying new gear. Most electronic musicians fail to take full advantage of what they already have, and think that some new gear will magically transform their music; it probably won't. What will transform your music is you.

This may be terrible advice, but I'll offer it anyway: Stay with the music itself, not the image you may be asked to project as a musician. The music industry emphasizes image far too much. Music has to be packaged and sold, and you may be asked to put forward some glamorous or grandiose posture. Personally, I think that even if it may sell more albums, it's not worth it. In the worst case scenario, you may come to believe in the personna projected and indulge in some form of artistic narcissism. That's very unhealthy for you as a human being. Yes, you will probably have to do photoshoots and interviews, but try to resist the projections of "the artist" that will be foisted on you. Maybe you and I will find ourselves on the vanguard of something new and refreshing: sincerity. Let's resist idolatry and give it a shot, shall we?

Q: Are you able to bring ideas back from your nocturnal dreams?

A: When I was in college, I once dreamed of wonderful music--a string quartet. When I awoke, I was excited, because I still remembered it in some detail. I skipped classes and hunkered down with a piano in a practice room at the school of music. I worked in a frenzy until late in the day, convinced that I had the makings of a masterpiece. Only when I got back to my dorm to finally take a shower did I realize the cosmic joke of it. The music was a masterpiece; it was the first movement of Ravel's magnificent F-major string quartet! Somehow, I had managed to believe that it was my own creation. I was still under the spell of the dream. While I had transcribed it in a different key, I went to the music library and checked out the score. I had actually written out a decent facsimile of part of the first movement. It's funny now, and slightly embarrassing, but here's what stuck with me: for a few brief hours, I believed myself to be in the grips of an astonishing, white-hot inspiration. It was exhilarating. I'm no Maurice Ravel and will never be, but since then, I have had other dionysian flashes of creative mania, in which I work without pause. Some of them have produced viable work. But mostly these days, my artistic process is rather work-a-day and not especially glamorous. Perhaps I have lost some of my youthful Romantic spirit, but I am content to simply show up and do the work now. When inspiration comes more volcanically, I can enjoy and embrace that, but it still has to be worked.

One dream image that I have retrieved and made use of is a personification of my Muse I have called "Erda." She is primal, my reflection of the Eternal Feminine, a dweller of subterranean spaces. For years, she appeared to me in dreams and served as a guide, often helping me to find my way out of caves and labyrinths, a bit like Ariadne. One morning, I awoke from an especially vivid dream of her, and I gave her a name and painted her portrait. She has never visited my dreams since then--perhaps she no longer needs to. She is a mistress of melancholy and mystery, elements which pervade much of my music. Just recently, my image of Erda has made its way into the artwork for the album Gnosis. I'm very glad she's there, accompanying a piece called "The Still Small Voice." So a strong dream can percolate into the waking world and be of some help, when attended to.

Truth be told, I rarely have meaningful dreams these days, but one thing I value even more about sleep is the way the brain processes problems and difficulties and often supplies answers on awakening. I like the Russian proverb, "Mornings are wiser than evenings," and when I reach an artistic or technical impasse, I often just sleep on it and trust my unconscious mind to process it while I sleep. I am often rewarded with successful solutions.

Q: What are your most cherished accomplishments?

A: I have been involved in some very rich artistic and satisfying collaborations. One was the stage drama, The Descent of Inanna, based on the ancient Sumerian myth of a goddess' descent into the underworld. It was offered in a local theatre and incorporated poetry, masks, dramatic staging, and a continuous score I composed. The poet, director, actors, mask-maker and I worked on it for over a year in a collaborative process that was very organic, and I think the result was stunning. I have also highly prized my various collaborations with modern dance choreographers, and fully enjoyed the work of making individual pieces and full-length performance works. I am also proud of my recorded music catalog. Since the early 90s, I've recorded eleven solo instrumental albums, and feel that the work has grown and matured with each. I also have some classical compositions that I'm very happy with, including a suite for solo cello, Eclipse, which was performed at the Oregon Bach Festival some years back.

Q: What have been your most important discoveries?

One important discovery, in my artistic journey, has been recognizing the importance of failure. I have a respectable body of completed works, but you should see my catalog of false starts, unrealized pieces and artistically untenable ideas! This used to frustrate me, but I have come to embrace my unworkable ideas--mental flotsam and jetsam--as part of the process of finding something worth developing. I made a piece of visual art that now hangs in the studio as a reminder. A few years ago, I found a box of music manuscripts that contained hundreds of my sketches that went nowhere. I decided to turn some of them into a collage of torn scraps, pasted over an image of the Buddha. Only one eye of the Budda, a bit of his head and a piece of his mouth poke through. Each musical fragment is outlined with a gold kintsugi border, reminding me that even what is broken, incomplete or faulty has its own purpose, and even a kind of beauty. The little bits of Buddha that show through remind me that there is "Buddha nature" even in what is rejected. I try to see my life in the same way, collaging my unhappy choices, failures and regrets on the canvas of memory, and forging them together with a golden seam. Our missteps and sufferings, as well as our successes, are part of the larger and richer human experience that add up to a complete life. As a composer, all feelings are to be honored and welcomed. Rumi says:

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
as an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they’re a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still, treat each guest honorably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

For deeper inspiration, Allen reconnected with the ancient Greek philosophers who he was first enraptured with in his twenties. He found music in Plato’s inquiries; he saw in philosophical paradoxes the push-and-pull of musical counterpoint, the tension and release of dissonance and resolution. On GNOSIS (γνῶσις), Chronotope Project uses his signature jazz and classical-inflected progressive ambient sound to portray the greatest philosophical inquiry of all: a quest for knowledge.

This quest is painted with a wide array of styles: deep drones and ambient textures, classical counterpoint and driving polyrhythms, atonal sound painting and unabashed romanticism. The diverse sounds here are anchored by the flute-like timbre of the Haken Continuum Fingerboard synthesizer, which appears throughout as the knowledge-seeking protagonist. These richly-layered soundscapes evoke the majesty of myth, from the cosmic arpeggios of “Higgs Field, Cauldron of Being” to the intimate pastoral of “The Still Small Voice.”

Allen’s skill as a sonic storyteller is on full display in every aspect of Gnosis. “Lethe, the River of Forgetfulness,” finds the seeker drifting down one of the five rivers of Hades. Souls drink from Lethe to let go of their mortal memories before continuing their journey. A cello bassline embodies Lethe’s current, pulling the seeker further and further; a subtle Rhodes piano entwines with the Haken Continuum as the seeker’s memories drift away into the water. Then, on “Eidos, Realm of the Forms,” the seeker arrives at the Eternal Forms, which possess the structure needed to understand the world’s true nature. The seeker’s questions spiral through the hypnotic rhythm of the Forms, built from warm textures and hand percussion. In the album closer, the eerie and harrowing “Myth of the Cave,” the seeker vanishes, overwhelmed by the truth of the absolute—before, knowledge achieved, a twirling harp ushers in an ascendant finale.

"Gnosis" is one of many Greek words for knowledge, referring to knowledge gained through experience. The breadth of this album reflects this: GNOSIS (γνῶσις) traverses the ominous and serene, the harmonic and the dissonant to render the accords and contradictions of philosophy in Chronotope Project’s signature cinematic sound.

Jeffrey Ericson Allen is credited with all compositions, performances, recording and mixing; the album was mastered by Howard Givens, and midwifed by Deborah Martin. GNOSIS (γνῶσις) is available for physical purchase in CD format and in 24-BIT AUDIOPHILE, CD QUALITY LOSSLESS, MP3 and streaming formats. The CD version of GNOSIS (γνῶσις) arrives in a gift-worthy factory sealed 6-panel gatefold package that includes vibrant artwork, liner notes, a 6-page booklet, and artful package design by Daniel Pipitone.

Media may request artist interviews, media review copies, and additional artwork from Beth Ann Hilton (beth@spottedpeccary.com) at Spotted Peccary Music.

Tracklist:
1 Higgs Field: Cauldron of Being
2 Lethe, the River of Forgetfulness
3 Eidos, Realm of the Forms
4 The Still Small Voice: The Muse Speaks
5 Entelechy, Emergent Order
6 Myth of the Cave

About Chronotope Project:
Jeffrey Ericson Allen is an Oregonian composer, cellist and electronic music recording artist with an extensive and eclectic background in classical, new acoustic and theatrical music production. Chronotope Project represents his most recent expression as a creator of contemporary progressive ambient music. “Chronotope” refers to the essential unity of space and time, a concept with numerous expressions in literature, physics and the arts. The music of Chronotope Project explores this time-space confluence and invites the listener on ambient journeys of deep texture infused with gentle pulsing rhythms and soulful melodies. https://chronotope-project.com/

About Spotted Peccary Music:
Portland-based Spotted Peccary Music is North America’s finest independent record label with a focus on deep, vast and introspective soundscapes. For over three decades, the artists of Spotted Peccary have been on a mission to develop, produce, publish and release ultra-high-quality, deep-listening experiences that engage the listener and exceed expectations. Every release is carefully prepared in a variety of high quality formats from MP3 to high-res studio masters. Explore more than 165 titles and 45 artists at www.SpottedPeccary.com and www.AmbientElectronic.com.

Links:
Smart link: https://orcd.co/gnosis
Album Overview and links: https://spottedpeccary.com/shop/gnosis/
Unboxing video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBUlACfDHYc
bandcamp: https://ambientelectronic.bandcamp.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spottedpeccary/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/spottedpeccary
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/1b5OZ08E4AAtPlYcGkFhf6?si=XT7S5fOiQjqzD1oUJ7TrHw&dl_branch=1
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Incorporating the sounds of energy with field recordings, Bart Hawkins has created VISION OF EDEN, a meditation inspired by the ancient story of the Garden of Eden. Creating a concept album is about forming a musical vision that ties all the tracks into a cohesive story. In this new album, there are five visions that take the listener on a musical journey from the peace and unity found inside the Garden of Eden, to the serpent’s temptation of a ‘better' world of all-knowing power, to eating the forbidden fruit that contains a ‘virus’ of an illusionary world of separation and the loss of innocence. The last vision returns the listener to the garden with a message that the Tree of Life and its experience of the totality of unity has never left.

“I embrace the modular challenge to create my own unique sonic signature and to shape the character of that sound to tell a story in real time.” As with his previous albums, 21 Pulse Eclipse (also on Spotted Peccary Music), and self-produced album Last Ride in Leonardo Da Vinci’s Helicopter, Vision of Eden was created on a modular synth. “As a sound artist, using a modular synth is extremely freeing and challenging at the same time by creating, shaping and sculpting the raw sounds into a musical journey.” Using the modular synth as a musical instrument is a unique immersive experience unlike any I have experienced. It forces me to be open to possibilities and non rational exportations."

The opening track “Garden of Grace" immediately invites the listener into Eden’s otherworldly beauty. Warm chimes ebb and flow like a breeze through branches, evoking the latticed glow of sunlight through trees. Sounds of children playing echo through this expansive ambience.

"On the track 'Sidewinder,' I placed an electric guitar on my lap and weaved several forks and spoons between the strings to produce a hypnotic effect of the serpent’s temptation. On "Descent Into The Forbidden Fruit" I wanted to play with a single tone, how far can I push it and still be interesting and powerful? I wanted this piece to be like a ‘bad’ psychedelic experience, where you take a bite of the ‘fruit’ and the descent or fall into separation madness begins." It begs the question of old sages, are we hallucinating our separate reality right now as we continue to eat from the Tree of Good/Evil? A dream within a dream? An abandoned nightmare.

Vision of Eden draws its story from the book of Genesis, presenting this time-honed tale in a bold new format. Shimmering fractals of sound guide the listener from Eden’s peace to the world’s swirling creation to the Serpent’s temptation and beyond. Hawkins describes his vision, "Where the conscious and unconscious mind meet to create a playground where the totality of unity can be experienced, held together by the grace of the Tree of Life."

From the book of Genesis 2:16–17: "Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die." The story of the tree of knowledge of good and evil, Adam and Eve tested by temptation and dangerous forbidden knowledge, has been found in the Talmud and the Jewish Kabbalah, in the Sumerian story of Enki and Ninhursag, in Greek mythology as the garden of the Hesperides; the term jannāt ʿadni ("Gardens of Eden" or "Gardens of Perpetual Residence") is used in the Qur'an for the destination of the righteous. Followers of the Latter-Day Saint movement believe that after Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden they resided in a place known as Adam-ondi-Ahman, located in present-day Daviess County, Missouri.

Though his fascination with Genesis began in childhood, Hawkins’ recent move to a sixty-four acre ranch brought renewed inspiration. “Ever since I was a child, I have been fascinated by the creation story with the garden that contains the two magical trees of creation and a deceptively talking snake.” Hawkins continues, “As a child I wanted to be a herpetologist, as I had several boas, lizards and other reptiles and amphibians. I currently do not have any pets, but have plenty of wildlife in my backyard.”

While sitting under the trees at his ranch, Hawkins explains, “I was inspired by the dynamical relationship between the Tree of Life and the Tree of Good and Evil and the different ways they affect human life.” Here, Hawkins takes a familiar story into uncharted territory. Sometimes serene, sometimes harrowing, yet always immersive, Vision of Eden is a complex and dreamlike that thrums with the energy of invention.

The final track, “Dragonfly Speaks” (12:17) becomes a return to nature. An ancient healing drum beat with warm overtones in the background give way to bright shafts of light appearing and disappearing as sounds of fluting wings dance from ear to ear. Yet the temptation to take another bite from the forbidden fruit still lingers with tension. The natural attitude that consciousness is part of nature as experienced by the person experiencing it, which invites systematic reflection on and study of the structures of consciousness and the phenomena that appear in acts of consciousness. There is something magical about dragonflies, which were some of the first winged insects to evolve. Fossils of very large dragonfly ancestors in the Protodonata are found from 325 million years ago (Mya) in Upper Carboniferous rocks; these had wingspans up to about 750 mm (30 in). About 3,012 species of dragonflies were known in 2010, dragonflies live mostly in tropical areas from sea level up to the mountains on every continent except Antarctica, the Treeline Emerald Dragonfly also lives in northern Alaska, within the Arctic Circle, making it the most northerly of all dragonflies.

Some Pueblo, Hopi, and Zuni traditions associate dragonflies with transformation, and are said to refer to dragonflies as "snake doctors" because they believe dragonflies follow snakes into the ground to heal them if they become injured. "Dragonfly Speaks" is a return to nature. An ancient healing drum beat with warm overtones in the background give way to bright shafts of light appearing and disappearing as sounds of fluting wings dance from ear to ear. Yet the temptation to take another bite from the forbidden fruit still lingers with tension. The natural attitude that consciousness is part of nature as experienced by the person experiencing it, which invites systematic reflection on and study of the structures of consciousness and the phenomena that appear in acts of consciousness.

Modular synthesizers can convey the sound of energy with extended textural planes with some variant areas that provide contrast, imagine a winged Snake that communicates with the Earth Element or the great feathered Serpent Quetzalcoatl, from Aztec traditions. Among scholars who consider it to have been real, there have been various suggestions, frequently in the path as a healer who must undergo trials and tribulations takes the phenomena of stars, nova, supernova, quasars and gamma-ray bursts, the universe's highest-output energy transformations of matter and the objects of consciousness do not have to be a physical object apprehended in perception, it can just as well be a fantasy or a memory.

“Vision of Eden” is an impressive and immersive philosophical musical experience. This visionary album is beautifully created, crafted and well thought out. “I embrace the modular challenge to create my own unique sonic signature and to shape the character of that sound to tell a story in real time.” The Tree of Life can be experienced as a nonlinear, non-rational unity experience, where the Tree of Good/Evil is a linear, rational, separation experience. Both Trees exist simultaneously yet the Tree of Life includes the Tree of good/evil but the Tree of good/Evil excludes the Tree of life.

There is an old expression: “Be in this world but not of it,” (interpreted, for example, in the Book of John, in the Bible). Reflecting on this scientifically, Hawkins realized that for tens of thousands of years we are taught to observe and react. Repetitions of this process perpetually reinforce a reality in which we exist separate from the source, or eating from the Tree of Good/Evil. This self organizing pattern exists prior to any human awareness and serves both the structure and process of every living system. This separation "construct" becomes hardwired in our brains, thus we perceive and experience everything as separate, absent of source.

Thus humanity has built all social, political, religious, economic, scientific and any organizational systems entirely based on the human illusionary perception of separation. This limited perception of reality keeps humanity on the road to Hell that is paved with 'good' intentions. An endless fractal loop, an echo chamber, of our own making. Now how to put this into a musical form?

The album released on June 18, 2021 in a variety of formats available at https://spottedpeccary.com/shop/vision-of-eden/ as well as on Bandcamp and on streaming platforms worldwide; visit https://orcd.co/vision-of-eden for popular links.

Tracklist:
1 Garden of Grace
2 Orbital Eccentricity
3 Sidewinder
4 Descent Into The Forbidden Fruit
5 Dragonfly Speaks

About Bart Hawkins:
Electronic music composer and modular synthesist Bart Hawkins’ dedication to inner sonic exploration began in the early 80’s when his practice of Zen Meditation and love of the Berlin School style of electronic music launched him into a world of musical landscapes, sonic textures, and silence, sparking a spiritual awakening into the power of sound. His time as a professional film & video producer and cinematographer soon led to experiments with tape loops, delays, re-recording techniques, and the mixing of ambient sounds to create visual listening experiences. Now, diving headlong into the world of modular synthesis, Bart’s sonic creations guide listeners through an electric universe of sound, vision, and consciousness.

About Spotted Peccary Music:
Portland-based Spotted Peccary Music is North America’s finest independent record label with a focus on deep, vast and introspective soundscapes. For over three decades, the artists of Spotted Peccary have been on a mission to develop, produce, publish and release ultra-high-quality, deep-listening experiences that engage the listener and exceed expectations. Every release is carefully prepared in a variety of high quality formats from MP3 to high-res studio masters. Explore more than 165 titles and 45 artists at www.SpottedPeccary.com and www.AmbientElectronic.com.

Links:
Bandcamp: https://ambientelectronic.bandcamp.com/
Spotted Peccary Album page: https://spottedpeccary.com/shop/vision-of-eden/
Album Unboxing Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuiWMigrDsw
Spotted Peccary Artist page: https://spottedpeccary.com/artists/bart-hawkins/
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